top of page
Search
  • Writer's pictureskylarkcolo

MILES OF FEED-LINES

Updated: Feb 6



There are miles of feed-lines at K0UO, consisting of open wire balance ladder feeds, 50 ohm hard-lines 1 5/8", 7/8" & 1/2" , 50 ohm coax (LMR 400/600), 72 ohm Hard-lines 7/8, 3/4/, & 1/2in, 72 ohm RG11 with a 12 gauge steel messenger cable for overhead, 72 ohm RG6 for receive antennas, along with hundreds of jumper coax cables.



ABOVE: I USE IT BY THE SPOOL!


Above: On the fence RG11 for some of the RX antennas, 7/8" hardline to one of the main rhombic control boxes, overhead from the barn to the house is a number of coax lines with messenger cables for overhead. Also see the 100Ft tower on left,195Ft tower in mid photo, and a 50 ft by the house.

Above: 7/8in Hard-line with grounding every 200 feet.


Below: The some feeders on tee post going across the flooded creek!



The some feeders on tee post going across the flooded creek!

They have since been reinstalled on 10 high steel pipe to keep about the water

ABOVE: With some of you antennas over 1000 to 1500 feet from the shack, you need a lot of feed-lines!



BELOW: RX ANTENNA 72 OHM, I USE ROLLS OF OVERHEAD COAX WITH A MESSENGER CABLE FOR SUPPORT


ABOVE: 1/2 IN OVERHEAD COAX WITH A MESSENGER CABLE FOR SUPPORT


ABOVE: RG11 WITH MESSENGER CABLE FOR SUPPORT



ABOVE: OPEN WIRE FEEDERS FROM THE ANTENNA, an exponential taper feed  800 ohm balanced to 50 Ohms balanced termination.




ABOVE: I use larger heavy duty utility type hardware, and have never lost an antenna from an ice or wind storm


ABOVE: BUILDING OPEN WIRE BALANCE FEEDERS (880 OHMS)

ABOVE: 3 WIRE OPEN FEEDER, I JUST SWITCH THE TOP OR BOTTOM WIRE, TO CHANGE FROM EITHER OF MY TWO 1200 FOOT LONG V-BEAM ANTENNAS.

ABOVE: OPEN BALANCE LINE TO THE CONTROL BOX


Above: Open wire feeders with 10 amp relays and lightning protection. 

Also your antenna will need a Ladder line static bleeder of some type.


SEE:

DXE has on now also


ABOVE: A RF CURRENT METER TO RF CHECK OF OPEN LADDER LINES, you are trying to achieve equal current on each leg.


Or the old Twin-Lamp


ABOVE: Station 2, Look under the desk-top at the roll of Alpha Delta antenna switches with center ground, with is the final lightning protection point. With thunderstorms possible on any day from spring to fall here in Kansas you can unhook dozens of cable all the time. I also have a master switch which kills power on all the remote control boxes and shunts all the antennas to ground in the field. I never leave my shack with out turning off the master switch, which also disconnects all 220 AC, 120 AC, and 12 DC power to all equipment. Storms can pop-up fast out on the High Plains of Kansas.

ABOVE: A roll of Alpha Delta antenna switches


ABOVE: A COAX PATCH PANEL


ABOVE: Is a lightning strike counter which attaches to tower structures, with a good ground system sometimes you never know that lightning hit your site. With a counter you know. Then you will need to check out your grounding, and make repairs before the next hit.


ABOVE: UNDER GROUND LINES CAN BE HARD WORK!



ABOVE: 1000s of FOOT OF LADDER LINES IN USE, 800 to 400 ohms

ABOVE: SPARE HARD-LINE, IT IS BIG!



ABOVE & BLOW: REPAIRS ON THE HARD-LINE DIM CONNECTORS



15 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All
Post: Blog2_Post
bottom of page